By Alfonsina Scarinzi

ISBN-10: 9401793786

ISBN-13: 9789401793780

ISBN-10: 9401793794

ISBN-13: 9789401793797

The undertaking of naturalizing human consciousness/experience has made nice technical strides (e.g., in mapping components of mind activity), yet has been hampered in lots of instances through its uncritical reliance on a dualistic “Cartesian” paradigm (though as the various authors within the assortment indicate, assumptions drawn from Plato and from Kant additionally play a role). the current quantity proposes a model of naturalism in aesthetics drawn from American pragmatism (above all from Dewey, but in addition from James and Peirce)—one primed from the beginning to determine people not just as embodied, yet as inseparable from the surroundings they have interaction with—and presents a discussion board for authors from various disciplines to handle particular clinical and philosophical matters in the anti-dualistic framework contemplating aesthetic event as a means of embodied meaning-making. Cross-disciplinary contributions come from best researchers together with Mark Johnson, Jim Garrison, Daniel D. Hutto, John T. Haworth, Luca F. Ticini, Beatriz Calvo-Merino.

The quantity covers pragmatist aesthetics, neuroaesthetics, enactive cognitive technological know-how, literary reviews, psychology of aesthetics, artwork and layout, sociology.

Show description

Read Online or Download Aesthetics and the Embodied Mind: Beyond Art Theory and the Cartesian Mind-Body Dichotomy PDF

Best phenomenology books

Download e-book for kindle: Phenomenology and the Human Positioning in the Cosmos: The by

The vintage belief of human transcendental recognition assumes its self-supporting existential prestige in the horizon of life-world, nature and earth. but this assumed absoluteness doesn't entail the character of its powers, neither their constitutive strength. This latter demand an existential resource achieving past the generative life-world community.

New PDF release: Phenomenology, Science, and Geography: Spatiality and the

Introduction
1 technology and man
2 technological know-how and phenomenology
3 The plan of this work
4 'Geographical phenomenology'
5 The disciplinary context

PART I GEOGRAPHY and standard METAPHYSICS
Geographical discourse and its imperative themes
6 easy ideas of technology and the strategy applicable to ontology
7 Objectivism and subjectivism
8 Positivism and naturalism
8a The a-historical nature of positivism
8b The Enlightenment and positivism
8c Naturalism and idealism
9 Kantian ontology of fabric nature
10 Conceptions of actual area and geography
10a The emergence of geography as an summary, theoretical science
10b Social physics
11 actual house, cognitive behaviouralism and the flip to subjectivity
12 The mode of being attribute of geographical objects

PART II GEOGRAPHY AND PHENOMENOLOGY
The interpretation of phenomenology in geography
13 The phenomenological foundation of geography
14 Geographical phenomenology
14a Phenomenology and useful research
15 ways to geographical phenomenology
15a the mandatory contrast among humanism and geography
15b Existentialism
16 The view of science
16a Phenomenology as criticism
16b Phenomenology as anti-science
16c The foundational function of phenomenology
16d Phenomena of lived experience
17 The flip to the lifeworld, and the anomaly of flooring and object
18 The phenomenological method
18a Intentionality

Geographical phenomenology: a critique of its foundations
19 The metaphysics of geographical phenomenology
20 Humanism and the confusion of the 'objective' and the 'subjective'
20a Subjectivity and intentionality
20b Individualism
20c The 'things themselves', 'consciousness' and 'the challenge of the target world'
2od Idealism
21 Geographical phenomenology: its inner critique
21a Phenomenology and standards of validity
22 The flip to Schiitz's constitutive phenomenology and justifying a go back to Husserl

PART III PHENOMENOLOGY AND THE query OF HUMAN SCIENCE
Husserlian phenomenology: the foundational project
23 what's phenomenology?
23a Phenomenology: its origins and foundations
23b The typical attitude
23c Empirical technology and natural science
23d unique intuition
23c Phenomena and intentionality
24 the necessity for phenomenology
24a The quandary of distance among technological know-how and life
24b The critique of the optimistic sciences
24c The constitution of the realm and 'objects' of science
24d Phenomenology and the guiding notion of science

Phenomenology, technology and phenomenological geography
25 Descriptive phenomenology and science
25a Sciences of truth and sciences of essence
25b Descriptive phenomenology
26 Phenomenology, technological know-how and lifeworld
26a The lifeworld ontology
26b The sciences and the lifeworld
26c The technological know-how of the lifeworld
26d Lifeworld and transcendental phenomenology

Towards a basic ontology of science
27 Phenomenology and a primary ontology of science
28 technology and objectivation in geography
28a How does theoretical discovery arise?
28b the standard international and the theoretical attitude
29 the improvement of technology and the concept that of 'progress'
30 Human technology and objectification
31 Rigour and exactitude in science
32 concept and its succeed in and carry over nature and world
33 technology and the lived world

PART IV HUMAN technological know-how, WORLDHOOD, AND SPATIALITY
Implications for the human sciences and a human technological know-how of geography
34 Phenomenology
35 Phenomenology and the technological know-how of geography
36 in the direction of a proper projective human science
37 Husserl and human science
38 in the direction of a proper and a priori 'mathesis of spiritand of humanity'
39 The existential analytic and the human sciences
40 The existential analytic and the 'natural notion of the world' (or lifeworld)

Towards an knowing of human spatiality
41 Geography, global and space
42 global and worldhood
43 Space
43a The technological view of space
43b The spatiality of the present-at-hand
44 the typical mode of being-in-the-world
45 The spatiality of the ready-to-hand: locations and regions
46 area and science
47 Man's spatiality
48 area and man's spatiality
49 position and house: implications for a nearby ontology of spatiality for a geographical human technological know-how

De L’Éthique À La Justice: Langage et politique dans la by Ernst Wolff PDF

Emmanuel Lévinas est le philosophe de los angeles non-indifférence; il n’est en aucune sorte un philosophe indifférent. Son inquiétude personnelle et engagement politique ont trouvé une expression philosophique dans une quête � deux versants. Dans le versant ontologique, il cherche � montrer que même si l’homme est l’événement de compréhension de l’être, tout l’homme et toute signification ne se réduisent pas � l. a. compréhension de l’être seul.

The origins of responsibility by François Raffoul PDF

François Raffoul ways the idea that of accountability in a way that's detailed from its conventional interpretation as responsibility of the willful topic. Exploring accountability within the works of Nietzsche, Sartre, Levinas, Heidegger, and Derrida, Raffoul identifies decisive moments within the improvement of the idea that, retrieves its origins, and explores new reflections on it.

Extra resources for Aesthetics and the Embodied Mind: Beyond Art Theory and the Cartesian Mind-Body Dichotomy

Example text

The view I am presenting was first put forth 80 years ago by John Dewey in Art as Experience [11], where he says, “I have tried to show in these chapters that the esthetic is no intruder in experience from without, whether by way of idle luxury or transcendent ideality, but that it is the clarified and intensified development of traits that belong to every normally complete experience” ([11], 52–53). In art, we encounter the qualitative elements and processes of human meaning-making in ways that show us fuller possibilities for significance and growth.

29. Tolstoy, Leo. 1896. What is Art? Trans. Almyer Maude. New York: MacMillan Publishing Company, 1960. 30. Zbikowski, Lawrence. 2002. Conceptualizing music: Cognitive structure, theory, and analysis. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Chapter 3 Dewey’s Aesthetics of Body-Mind Functioning Jim Garrison Abstract My chapter provides a genetic trace of the embodied actions (the “deeds” or pragma) of the live creatures we call Homo sapiens from the primacy of the aesthetic encounter with the precognitive qualitative situation that initiates inquiry, to the role of embodied feelings involved in selective attention that determine data for inference, to the cognitive role of embodied habits in establishing logical universals and carrying out thoughtful deliberation in artistically creating the consummatory aesthetic forms of techno-scientific inquiry.

J. Boydston. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1988. 11. Dewey, John. 1934. Art as experience. In The later works, 1925–1953, vol. 10, ed. J. Boydston. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1987. 12. Dickie, George. 1974. Art and the aesthetic: An institutional analysis. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. 13. Feldman, Jerome. 2006. From molecule to metaphor: A neural theory of language. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. 14. Gadamer, Hans Georg. 1975. Truth and Method. Trans. G. Barden and J.

Download PDF sample

Aesthetics and the Embodied Mind: Beyond Art Theory and the Cartesian Mind-Body Dichotomy by Alfonsina Scarinzi


by John
4.5

Rated 4.93 of 5 – based on 8 votes