By Angela Ales Bello (auth.), Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka (eds.)

ISBN-10: 1402037066

ISBN-13: 9781402037061

ISBN-10: 1402037074

ISBN-13: 9781402037078

The man or woman is this day on the middle of clinical, social, moral and philosophical debates.

The Human Condition-in-the-unity-of-everything-there-is-alive, lower than whose aegis the current number of essays falls, deals the urgently wanted new method of reinvestigating humanness. whereas contemporary advances within the neurosciences, genetics and bio-engineering problem the normal summary belief of "human nature", indicating its transformability, hence putting in place query the most tenets of conventional philosophical anthropology, within the new viewpoint of the Human artistic Condition the human person is visible in its emergence and unfolding in the dynamic networks of the logos of life, and in the evolution of dwelling forms. simply a similar, the creative emblems of the brain lifts the human individual right into a sphere of freedom. in the networks of the trademarks we retrieve the classical rules – human topic, ego, self, physique, soul, individual – reinterpret them to counter the naturalistic critique (Tymieniecka).

Thus rules of a brand new philosophical anthropology pleasant the necessities of the current time are laid down.

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1 technological know-how and man
2 technology and phenomenology
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Geographical discourse and its relevant themes
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Extra info for Logos of Phenomenology and Phenomenology of the Logos. Book Two: The Human Condition in-the-Unity-of-Everything-there-is-alive. Individuation, Self, Person, Self-determination, Freedom, Necessity

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Levine, 1983, p. 354). Noematical N phenomenology of the experience of the lived body further leads to an identification of the phenomenal properties of the lived body, more precisely its crucial sensibility. More importantly, a complementary noetical phenomenology identifies a specific bodily selfawareness as the proper phenomenal consciousness (subjective experience) of embodiment. Phenomenology thus leads to the clarification of several central issues in the actual discussion about the possibility of naturalizing consciousness: a: the distinction of phenomenal consciousness and so-called qualia; b: identification of the latter with phenomenal properties of represented objects and of the former with bodily selfawareness; c: defence of a nonrepresentatonalist conception of phenomenal consciousness.

Naturalism explains the world by assuming that all phenomena constitute a causal unity, which is ultimately grounded in physical processes. As far as conscious life is concerned, naturalism entails the comprehension of the body as a particular physical object, namely a living organism displaying peculiar properties such as its sensibility and voluntary, intentional movement. Since no physical thing can sense or intentionally move itself, these psychological properties are not really proper material characteristics, but must nevertheless have a physical explanation.

It would seem that with the complex of life attained in the human person we have the highest accomplishment of the logos of life. The person’s existential course could appear to be the triumph of the logos in its artistry – to have brought ontopoietic progress from subservience to universal conditions through a long and winding path of self-formation to the culmination of the release of the force of decision having at its command the skill to invent and plan. But the freedom of absolute selfhood is not the crowning achievement of the logos.

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Logos of Phenomenology and Phenomenology of the Logos. Book Two: The Human Condition in-the-Unity-of-Everything-there-is-alive. Individuation, Self, Person, Self-determination, Freedom, Necessity by Angela Ales Bello (auth.), Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka (eds.)


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