By Chr Macann

ISBN-10: 0792309235

ISBN-13: 9780792309239

For a few 20 years now, i've been engaged on a philosophical programme which falls into elements, a scientific metaphysics, to be entitled Being and turning into, conceived within the common framework of ontological phenomenology, yet utilising what I name a 'genetic' methodol­ ogy, and an ancient interpretation, designed to aid and make sure the ontological philosophy in query. The historic a part of the general programme was once initially conceived within the type of an Epochal Interpretation of the heritage of contemporary philosophy from Descartes on. a part of the cloth gathered in the direction of such an Epochal Interpretation has despite the fact that been deployed fairly in a different way. First, the Kant fabric has already been became an interpretive transforma­ tion of Kant's severe Philosophy. moment, the fabric on Husserl' s Phenomenological Philosophy now kinds the foundation of the current learn. The interpretive transformation of Kant's severe philosophy was once released by means of iciness Verlag within the context of a Humboldt fellowship. In that paintings, I took Heidegger's Kant and the matter of Metaphysics as my version. Like Heidegger, I subjected the serious Philosophy to an interpre­ tive technique because of which i stopped up with constructions matching and reflecting the elemental constructions of my very own (genetic) ontology. yet I sought to beat definite boundaries inherent within the Heideggerian project.

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Additional info for Presence and Coincidence: The Transformation of Transcendental into Ontological Phenomenology

Sample text

Is necessarily held within the horizon of a kinaesthetic consciousness and can not transcend the latter. '25 In the context of a genetic investigation, hyletic apprehension is therefore something so radically immanent that, as yet, nothing transcendent can be said to correspond to it. '1ence. To put this another way, the pure hyle is even more immanent than what Husserl will call reelle Immanenz, since this latter is defined with respect to noetic phases which themselves contain an element of transcendence which is excluded with this regression to a purely hyletic apprehension.

How can these three conditions be applied to the problem of the constitution of the quite specific region of being which goes by the name of the Transcendental ego? Insofar as the Pure ego is examined from the standpoint of an implicit unity presupposed by the contents of a phenomenologically clarified field of consciousness, we can indeed talk of a pole of unity and a pole of diversity. Unfortunately however, the pole of unity is located on the side of the subject rather than that of the object and is, in consequence, nothing less than an explicit meaning given through the diversity of a stream of lived experience.

Ibid. ,pp. 81-82. , Enzyklopiidie, hrsg. Nicolin & Poggeler, Hamburg: Felix Meiner, 1969, 131, S. 134. Sartre, Jean-Paul, L' are et Ie neant, tr. by Hazel Barnes as Being and Nothingness, New York: Philosophical Library, 1956, p. 5. PART II De-Construction Introduction In the first part we took account of the basic principles underlying the two procedures of reduction and constitution. More specifically, we sought to trace the development of both these procedures through the three phases of Husserl's development from an epistemological, through a transcendental and so on to an ontological conception of phenomenology.

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Presence and Coincidence: The Transformation of Transcendental into Ontological Phenomenology by Chr Macann


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